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SHORT DESCRIPTION

A method for capturing, specifying, and analyzing software requirements


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ASSET PROFILE

UNIT NAME
REGUIDE
VERSION
1.0.9, SPC-92060-CMC, 01-DEC-93
ORIGIN
ASSET
REVIEW CODE
OK
INET ADDRESS
librarian@source.asset.com
AUTHOR
Software Productivity Consortium
RIGHTS
Approved for public release; distribution unlimited
COPYRIGHT
1993 SPC
LOCATION
ASSET
PAL

FILE LISTING

Directory Display


languages/ada/docs/reguide:
  File Name                 Size
  ---------                 ----
  README                   4,153
  reguide.zip          3,913,497


Totals
  ==============  ==============
    2 Files            3,917,650

ABSTRACT

Consortium Requirements Engineering Guidebook

    The Consortium Requirements Engineering (CoRE) method is a method
for capturing, specifying, and analyzing software requirements. The
Consortium has worked with industrial developers of real-time and
embedded systems to identify their key problems and to provide a method
that addresses their needs. CoRE supports the development of precise,
testable specifications that are demonstrably complete and consistent.
CoRE also supports key process issues, such as managing changing
requirements and reuse. CoRE is a single coherent requirements method
that:

* Integrates Object-Oriented and Formal Models Behavioral requirements
in CoRE are written in terms of two underlying models: the behavioral
model and the class mode. The behavioral model provides a standard
structure for analyzing and capturing behavioral requirements (i.e.,
what the software must do) in a form that is is precise, analyzable, and
testable. The class model provides facilities for organizing a CoRE
specification into parts; it provides facilities supporting change
management, reuse, and concurrent development. These models are
integrated in a single CoRE specification.

* Integrates Graphical and Rigorous Specifications. A key goal of the
method is to improve communication among the parties involved in
requirements engineering.  CoRE provides a graphic representation that
helps all parties, customers, engineers, designers, and programmers
grasp essential relationships among system components.  CoRE also
provides a rigorous underlying model for capturing detailed behavioral,
timing, and accuracy constraints. This rigorous model allows you to
develop requirements that are precise, unambiguous, testable, and
demonstrably complete and consistent. CoRE provides a consistent
interpretation of both graphical and rigorous notations so they combine
smoothly in a single specification.

* Uses Existing Skills and Notations. The language used to specify
requirements in CoRE is based on familiar concepts and existing
notations. You can apply CoRE using basic concepts familiar to
programmers and others writing requirements, e.g., events, Boolean
expressions, and state machines. Although CoRE is based on an underlying
mathematical mode, just as programming languages are based on formal
models, CoRE can be applied without a detailed understanding of
formalisms.

* Avoids Premature Design Decisions. CoRE allows you to specify
requirements without prematurely specifying design or implementation
details. CoRE describes required behavior in terms of relations that the
software must maintain between quantities that the software monitors and
those it controls. This allows you to specify what the software must do
without having to provide an algorithm or detailed design.

* Provides Guidance. The CoRE behavioral model provides practical
guidance in eliciting software requirements, developing a requirements
specification, and analyzing the specification for completeness and
consistency. The behavioral model defines exactly what requirements
information must be captured, and in what form, to develop a complete
and consistent specification.

    This guidebook provides a detailed guide to the practice of CoRE. It
is intended as an engineering handbook that systems and software
engineers can use as a reference when applying the CoRE method. It
describes the following:

* The goals and benefits of the CoRE method

* The underlying concepts and principles used to develop rigorous
requirements specifications in CoRE

* The set of notations and specification techniques needed to write a
CoRE specification

* A complete requirements development process starting with system-level
requirements as input and ending with a software requirements
specification as output

* Heuristics for applying specific techniques to accomplish your
specification goals, such as reuse or change management

* Criteria and a process for checking a CoRE specification for
completeness and consistency

* Illustration of the techniques and heuristics through a common
example-the Fuel Level Monitoring System (FLMS)


REVISION HISTORY

1.0.9  1 June 94  Initial release to the PAL


RELEASE NOTICE

Approved for public release; Distribution unlimited


DISCLAIMER

This documentation is provided "AS IS" and without any expressed or
implied warranties whatsoever.  No warranties as to performance,
merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose exist.

The user must assume the entire risk and liability of using this
document.  In no event shall any person or organization of people be
held responsible for any direct, indirect, consequential or
inconsequential damages or lost profits.