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SHORT DESCRIPTION

Guide on transferring technology from one organization to another


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ASSET PROFILE

UNIT NAME
TECHXFER
VERSION
2.0.8, SPC-92046-CMC, 01-DEC-93
ORIGIN
ASSET
REVIEW CODE
OK
INET ADDRESS
librarian@source.asset.com
AUTHOR
Software Productivity Consortium
RIGHTS
Approved for public release; distribution unlimited
COPYRIGHT
1993 SPC
LOCATION
ASSET
PAL

FILE LISTING

Directory Display


languages/ada/docs/techxfer:
  File Name                 Size
  ---------                 ----
  README                   4,815
  techxfer.zip         3,596,939


Totals
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    2 Files            3,601,754

ABSTRACT

Using New Technologies: A Technology Transfer Guidebook

    For the past ten years, the data processing profession has been
slowly learning that technology transfer is one of its biggest problems,
if not the biggest problem.

 --Ed Yourdon, Forward, Agents of Change


                          Section Objectives

1. Explain why you should be concerned about technology transfer

2. Explain the relationship between technology transfer and process
improvement

3. Describe the guidebook's contents

    Using New Technologies provides practical guidance on how to
successfully transfer technology into your organization. Aimed at
engineers and managers, the guidance is distilled from a broad base of
experience and research and is illustrated by numerous examples. This
guidance can be used both as part of a process improvement effort and in
support of individual technology transfers.
    This guidebook helps you, the technology consumer:

* Understand the importance of management support and user buy-in to the
transfer and understand how to acquire them

* Ensure that the technology and transfer strategy are consistent with
your organization's needs and culture

* Successfully plan and implement the technology transfer

    This guidebook helps you address the challenges --- technical,
economical, human, and organizational --- in making your organization
willing and able to transfer and use new technology.
    Rapidly changing markets, tighter budgets, increasingly critical
roles for technology, and new government and standards' requirements are
issues that engineers and managers contend with daily. These factors
require organizations to successfully select, adapt, introduce, and use
new technologies. Because of these factors, all organizations transfer
in new technology at one time or another; many do so frequently.
However, most organizations follow an ad hoc technology transfer
process. Just as developing software through an ad hoc process leads to
spending more money than is needed on software development, transferring
technology through an ad hoc process also leads to spending money on
technology that is never recouped from using that technology.
    In all transfers, regardless of the technology, you can follow a
similar overall process for technology transfer. That is, the general
principles of what you do during a technology transfer will differ
little; how you do it may differ quite a bit. For example, in selecting
a computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tool or in selecting a new
network protocol, you should talk to potential users to understand their
needs and requirements. How you get their input may differ, but the fact
that you should get their input does not. You can take the same defined
technology transfer process and adapt it to each situation.  This
guidebook provides a defined technology transfer process that you can
adapt and use in all your transfer situations.

          Speed of Technology Change and Technology Transfer

    Technologies are changing at a dramatically faster rate than the
rate at which organizations transfer and use them. This section recounts
and compares studies on these rates of change in the software industry.
    This guidebook is organized as follows:

Section 1, Motivating Technology Transfer, justifies the use of a
technology transfer process and gives you a roadmap to the guidebook's
contents.

Section 2, Understanding the Technology Transfer Process, introduces the
technology transfer process, introduces technology transfer concepts,
and gives you the information you need to start and use the process
guidance.

Sections 3 through 7 contain guidance for the five steps of the
technology transfer process as follows:

Section 3, Look at Your Situation: Understand Context, helps you
understand your internal and external environment regarding the transfer
and define objectives and strategies for how to proceed.

Section 4, Choose the Right Path: Analyze Risks and Select Strategy,
helps you understand the risks associated with the transfer and select
the right strategy to follow.

Section 5, Focus the Transfer: Plan Technology Implementation, helps you
plan the next step of the technology implementation.

Section 6, Getting it Done: Implement Technology, helps you implement
the transfer as defined in the plan.

Section 7, Determine Where to Go Next: Review and Update Transfer Plan,
helps you understand the results of the transfer to date and how to
proceed based on the results.

Section 8, Improving Your Technology Transfer Process, provides general
guidelines for how to become proactive in technology transfer.

The Appendix, Checklists for Applying the Technology Transfer Process,
provides checklists that summarize the tasks you would perform in a
technology transfer.


REVISION HISTORY

2.0.8  1 June 94  Initial release to the PAL


RELEASE NOTICE

Approved for public release; Distribution unlimited


DISCLAIMER

This documentation is provided "AS IS" and without any expressed or
implied warranties whatsoever.  No warranties as to performance,
merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose exist.

The user must assume the entire risk and liability of using this
document.  In no event shall any person or organization of people be
held responsible for any direct, indirect, consequential or
inconsequential damages or lost profits.